Information

AB 691 - Proactively Planning for Sea-Level Rise Impacts

Trustees of granted lands with average annual gross public trust revenues exceeding $250,000 are required to submit a sea-level rise assessment and adaptation strategy to the Commission. The criteria, resources, and tools on this new website page are meant to assist trustees in protecting their trust lands from sea-level rise impacts and achieve the goals identified in AB 691.

Contact

Public Land Management Specialist
Reid Boggiano (916) 574-0450

CEQA

The Commission, as a California public agency, complies with the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) by considering environmental impacts for any proposed project, mitigating to less than significant any environmental impacts whenever possible, and disclosing this information to the public. To facilitate this and as required by CEQA, the Commission prepares certain documents, such as Environmental Impact Reports, Mitigated Negative Declarations, and Negative Declarations. These documents are publicly reviewed and considered by the Commission at public meetings.

Contacts

Chief, Environmental Planning and Management Division
Cy Oggins (916) 574-1880

Tribal Liaison
Jennifer Mattox (916) 574-1800

Environmental Justice Policy

The Commission's environmental justice policy is intended to achieve environmental justice in the Commission’s management of the lands and resources within its jurisdiction.

Contact

Chief, External Affairs
Sheri Pemberton (916) 574-1800

Federal Legislative Jurisdiction

The Commission is the agency authorized, on behalf of the state, to either cede legislative jurisdiction to the Federal Government or accept back a retrocession of such authority in-kind.

Contact

Legal Division
(916) 574-1850

GIS Data

A geographic information system, or GIS, is a computerized data management system used to capture, store, manage, retrieve, analyze, and display spatial information. GIS allows users to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize data in many ways. A primary goal of the Commission's GIS program is to leverage technology to make data about the lands and resources under the Commission's jurisdiction more accessible to the public.

Contact

GIS Coordinator
Phil Schlatter (916) 574-2328

Kapiloff Land Bank Fund

The Kapiloff Land Bank Act was created to facilitate settlements of title to real property with cash payments where substitute parcels are not readily available for acquisition or are not of equal value, and to facilitate mitigation through the pooling of such payments.

Contact

Assistant Executive Officer
Colin Connor (916) 574-1800

Land Classifications

Most of the lands that the Commission receives inquiries about fall into one of four categories: sovereign state-owned lands, lands sold directly to settlers from the federal government, lands granted to the state for sale or use, and lands granted under prior sovereign i.e. rancho and pueblo lands. The first question that is often asked is whether the Commission has jurisdiction to a property and the property’s ownership trajectory.

Contact

Lead Surveyor, Land Management Division
Jim Koepke (916) 574-2508

Legislation

The Legislative Affairs Office provides the Commission with legislative strategies to advance the Commission's management of public trust lands and resources. The Legislative Affairs Office also provides expert policy advice to the Administration and the Legislature on policy and fiscal implications of public land and resource management-related legislation. Additionally, the Legislative Affairs Office articulates the Commission's position on legislation proposed by the state Legislature and Congress and represents the Commission at Committee hearings.

The full versions of chaptered bills impacting the Commission are available on the Legislative Counsel's Bill Information web page.

Contact

Legislative Liaison
Sheri Pemberton (916) 574-1800

Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Councils

The role of these Trustee Councils is to use the settlement funds to restore injured natural resources and services to the condition that would have existed had the spill not occurred, and to compensate the public for the losses experienced from the date of the spill until the affected natural resources and services have recovered. For any spill in California waters, the Commission will participate in the resulting Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Council in its capacity as the landowner of the tidelands and submerged lands that were impacted by a spill.

Contact

Legal Division
(916) 574-1850

Oil and Gas Leases

The offshore oil and gas leases that the Commission manages today are those that were issued prior to 1969. While these leases generate significant non-tax revenue for the state, the Commission has consistently chosen to place environmental protection ahead of profits.. Many of the original leases issued in 1950s and 1960s have been quitclaimed, e.g., the right to the resources was formally returned back to the Commission.

Contact

Chief, Mineral Resources Management Division
Marina Voskanian (562) 590-5201

Reports and Audits

Every year, the Commission issues reports documenting its management of state school lands and the Kapiloff Land Bank Fund. Other reports issued by the Commission on a regular basis involve oil spill prevention, subventions, and the Marine Invasive Species Program. The Commission also issues a variety of reports on issues involving the lands and resources under its care, such as marine renewable energy and sea-level rise. Here you will find a repository of previous reports and audits issued by, or involving, the Commission.

Contact

Assistant Executive Officer
Colin Connor (916) 574-1800

School Lands

School lands were granted by the United States to California in 1853 to benefit public education; they include the 16th and 36th sections of each township, with the exception of lands reserved for public use or taken by private claims and lands known to be mineral-in-character. Lieu Lands (also called Indemnity Lands) are lands California selected in place of School Lands that were otherwise unavailable. This could have been because a particular 16th or 36th Section was located in the bed of a navigable river or already privately held.

Title to these lands passed to California upon approval of the U.S. Township Survey Plats, subject to the above exceptions. In 1927, the 1853 grant was amended to include minerals underneath school lands. California, like the other states, was required to use the land to support common schools. In 1982, the California Legislature enacted the School Lands Bank Act requiring the Commission to take all action necessary to fully develop school lands into a permanent and productive resource base for the benefit of the California State Teachers' Retirement System. School lands are generally located in the California desert and are what remain of the nearly 5.5 million acres granted to California by Congress in 1853 to benefit public education. Today, the Commission manages the surface and mineral ownership of hundreds of thousands of acres of school lands.

Contacts

Public Land Management Specialist
Jim Porter (916) 574-1865

Science Policy Advisor
Jennifer Mattox (916) 574-1800

Shipwrecks

Through the administration of the California Shipwreck and Historic Marine Resources Program, enacted by the State Legislature in 1989, the Commission strives to protect the historical value and environmental integrity of shipwreck sites. The recovery and restoration of the Brother Jonathan shipwreck is a result of this program. Although her remains have slowly disintegrated, the Brother Jonathan is the best preserved of any known gold rush-era steamer on the Pacific Coast. She lies 250 feet underwater, southeast of Jonathan Rock. Artifacts recovered include: beer bottles, stoneware, an ink stamp, ceramic pottery and gold coins.

Contact

Shipwrecks E-Mail (916) 574-1850

Water Boundaries

One of the important responsibilities of the Commission is to determine the extent and location of lands under the Commission's jurisdiction. The California Civil Code defines the boundary of tidelands as the ordinary high water mark. The United States Supreme Court has ruled that the mark is measured by the mean high tide line plotted against the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency's official tidal datum.

Contact

Lead Surveyor, Land Management Division
Jim Koepke (916) 574-2508